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India gets new missile system, SFDR test successful

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India gets new missile system, SFDR test successful Funny Jokes

India gets new missile system, SFDR test successful Funny Jokes

New Delhi : India on Friday morning successfully test-fired a missile based on solid fuel ducted ramjet (SFDR) technology from the Integrated Test Range Chandipur off the coast of Odisha. India and Russia have jointly developed this missile, which has a range of 100 to 200 km range.

During the test, all the systems, including the ground booster motor of the missile, met expectations and performed better. This technology will help ground-to-air and air-to-air missiles outperform and increase their strike range. New technologies during testing also include solid fuel ducted ramjet.

India’s Defense Research and Development Organization (DRDO) says that tests conducted from the Integrated Test Range Chandipur off the coast of Odisha at around 10.30 am today have demonstrated successful performance of solid fuel based ducted ramjet technology. All systems performed as expected, including ground booster motors and nozzle-less motors. Many new technologies, including solid fuel based ducted ramjet technology, have proved to be successful during testing.

Now India has got a technology that will enable DRDO to develop long-range air-to-air missiles. The SFDR is a missile propulsion based system currently being developed by the Defense Research and Development Organization. The missile is primarily being developed by the Defense Research and Development Laboratory at Hyderabad.

DRDO sources say that the project aims to develop critical technologies of long-range air-to-air missiles in the future. The system consists of thrust modulated ducted rocket, which has a smoke nozzle-less missile booster. Thrust modulation in this system is done by controlling the flow of hot gas. This missile system can go up to about 120 km at an altitude of 8 km with a speed of 2.3–2.5 Mach. Such a propulsion system substantially increases the speed and range of a missile, as it does not require an oxidizer. In its current form, solid fuel-based ducted ramjet-based missiles go to high-altitudes first to simulate launch conditions. The nozzle then guides the missile by firing a low booster. The missile booster is being developed independently by DRDO while the ramjet engine is being developed with Russian assistance.

The development of the SFDR began in 2013 and a five-year deadline was set for the actual demonstration to begin. The ground-based test of the missile began in 2017. The first test of solid fuel ducted ramjet was done on May 30, 2018. Through this test, India demonstrated nozzle-less boosters for the first time. The missile failed to activate the second stage of the ramjet engine during the test. The missile’s ramjet engine was successfully and second tested on 8 February 2019, in which the missile finally touched the ground at the desired speed according to the target.

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